Tartar in dogs & cats

Tartar in dogs & cats...

...a beastly problem

The build-up of tartar is a gradual process that affects almost all dogs and cats at some point in their lives. It results in painful Gum infections and Periodontitis, and in the worst case tooth loss and bone resporption.

Tartar is the term used to describe hard yellow to brownish deposits on the teeth that cannot be removed either by rinsing or brushing. Tartar is formed by mineral salts from saliva mixing with plaque.

Creation of tartar
 

Plaque is a soft accumulation of deposits consisting of saliva, the remnants of food, bacteria and their metabolic products (1). Eventually, the mineral salts in saliva cause these deposits to harden (2) (3). Tartar itself does not lead to infection, but the bacteria which stick to its rough surface do (4). The products of their metabolic processes, which include acids, attack the teeth and the gums. In cats and dogs, the area around the excretory ducts of the salivary glands is particularly susceptible to tartar – this is the inside of the incisors in the lower jaw and the outside in the upper jaw.

 

The amount of tartar that forms depends on various factors such as the amount of saliva produced, the size of the spaces between the teeth and the composition of the bacterial microflora in the mouth. Particular attention should be paid to good dental care in animals with a hereditary tendency for dental problems

No plaque, no tartar!

One consequence of tartar is periodontitis, a bacterial infection which can cause irreparable damage in the oral cavity. Left untreated, the only option is the mechanical removal of the tartar by the vet, which usually takes place under general anaesthetic. In the worst case, the vet must extract the entire tooth. For older animals and those with pre-existing medical conditions, however, a general anaesthetic can often be a risky procedure.

Before the condition reaches this stage, you should try Oral Clean+Care for dogs and cats.

Thanks to OralClean+Care ...
... you can spare your pet the anaesthetic involved in tartar removal. All anaesthetics put considerable strain on the body.
 

Tartar and its consequences
 

Tartar and its consequences
Tartar can cause gum infections which are extremely painful. Gum infections can attack the bone of the jaw and cause teeth to fall out.

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